Archery Stores Shun Recurve Bows

why dont archery stores stock recurve

Archery stores may not stock recurve bows due to a variety of reasons. Firstly, the high cost of stocking bows and the limited market for them can make it challenging for stores to justify keeping them in inventory. Stores need to make significant investments to stock multiple models, colours, and draw weight/length combinations, which may not sell quickly. This can lead to bows collecting dust on shelves and becoming outdated, resulting in financial losses for the business.

Additionally, some archery shops primarily cater to compound bow shooters, with staff who may not have the expertise to advise on recurve bows. This can create a mismatch between the products stocked and the needs of recurve enthusiasts. Furthermore, some shops may become 'dealers' for specific bow brands to keep competitors from offering the same lines in the same area, even if they don't intend to stock those bows. This can further limit the availability of recurve bows in certain regions.

However, some archery stores do specialise in traditional bows like recurves and longbows, and they can be excellent resources for archers seeking expertise and a wide range of options. These stores often have knowledgeable staff who are passionate about the sport and can provide valuable guidance to customers.

Characteristics Values
High cost of stocking bows Archery stores don't stock recurve bows because they are expensive to stock.
Lack of demand Recurve bows don't sell well, so stores are reluctant to stock them.
Limited market There is a limited market for recurve bows.
High number of models Bow companies have too many models in their product lines, making it difficult for dealers to stock them all.
Inaccurate information Manufacturer websites often list dealers that don't actually stock their bows or are reluctant to order them.
Exclusivity Some manufacturers give exclusive rights to dealers within a certain area, preventing other stores from stocking their bows.
Minimum order requirements Dealers may have to make a minimum order, which can be costly if they are unable to sell all the bows.
Shipping delays There can be shipping delays for new models, and older models can sit on the shelves for a long time.
High risk Stocking bows is a risky investment for dealers, as they may not be able to sell them all and will have to eat the cost.

shunoutdoor

Archery stores may not stock recurve bows because they are expensive to stock

Archery stores may also choose not to stock a particular brand or type of bow if they know it won't sell well in their area. This could be due to a lack of local interest in archery, or because the bow is marketed towards a different region. For example, one source mentions that Martin bows are not stocked by many dealers on the East Coast of the US because the company does not market their products strongly in that area.

Archery shops may also be reluctant to stock certain bows because they do not want to be left with old models that are hard to sell. Bows tend to depreciate quickly, and shops may be wary of investing in stock that could lose them money. This could also explain why some archery stores do not stock recurve bows.

Additionally, some manufacturers require dealers to place large minimum orders, which smaller shops may not be able to afford. Dealers may also be reluctant to stock certain bows because they are concerned about being left with unsold inventory if the manufacturer suddenly drops the price.

Finally, some archery shops may choose not to stock recurve bows because they specialise in a different type of archery, such as compound bows.

Archery: A Sport for Felons?

You may want to see also

shunoutdoor

Dealers may not stock bows that don't sell well

Some shops may also choose not to stock certain bows because they are difficult to sell. For example, left-handed bows make up a small percentage of bow sales, so shops may only stock the bare minimum of these. Similarly, shops may not stock certain models or colours of bows because they are harder to sell.

Additionally, some shops may only stock the bows that are strongly marketed in their area. Manufacturers need to spend a lot of money on marketing to get their bows into shops, and this can influence which bows dealers choose to stock. If a manufacturer doesn't do enough marketing in a particular area, dealers in that region may be less likely to stock their bows.

Finally, some shops may be reluctant to stock certain bows because they are concerned about the competition from online retailers. With the rise of e-commerce, it has become easier for customers to buy bows online, and this can make it harder for physical stores to sell certain types of bows.

shunoutdoor

Dealers may not stock bows that are hard to sell

Archery shops will generally stock what they know will sell and what their local market demands. They will also tend to stock bows that are strongly marketed in their area. If a particular bow isn't selling in their region, it doesn't make financial sense for them to stock it. Instead, they will invest in products that they know will move.

Additionally, bows are expensive, and there are many different models, colours, draw weights, and draw lengths to choose from. It is costly for a shop to stock one of every model, and they run the risk of not getting their investment back. Shops will usually only stock a few models, and even then, they may be reluctant to order a specific bow unless the customer pays upfront.

Some shops may also become authorised dealers of certain brands to prevent other shops in the area from carrying those lines. However, this doesn't necessarily mean they will stock those bows. They may become dealers simply to have easier access to parts or to offer warranty services.

Finally, some shops may not stock certain bows because they are hard to ship and take longer to arrive. This can be a problem, especially if a customer wants to try out the bow before purchasing it.

Knocking an Arrow: Longbow Basics

You may want to see also

shunoutdoor

Dealers may not stock bows that are not in demand in their local market

For example, a dealer might stock left-handed bows, but only in small quantities, as they make up a small percentage of overall bow sales. Dealers will also tend to stock bows that are strongly marketed in their area. If a particular bow is not well-marketed in a certain region, it is less likely to be stocked by local dealers.

Dealers also need to consider the financial risk of stocking expensive bows. If they are unable to sell a particular model, they will be forced to absorb the cost. This is especially true if the manufacturer does not allow returns. Dealers will be reluctant to tie up their capital in this way, especially if the model in question is not in high demand.

In addition, some manufacturers require dealers to place minimum orders, which can be a challenge for smaller shops. Dealers may also be reluctant to stock certain bows because of the time it takes to receive shipments. If a customer wants to order a particular bow, the dealer may have to wait several weeks for it to arrive, which can be frustrating for both the dealer and the customer.

Finally, dealers may be hesitant to stock certain bows because of the risk of those bows depreciating in value. Bows can lose value quickly, especially if a new model is released or if there are rumours of an upcoming release. Dealers do not want to be left with outdated stock that they have to sell at a loss.

For these reasons, dealers may choose not to stock certain bows, including recurve bows, if they do not believe there is sufficient local demand.

Longbow's Infinity Challenge

You may want to see also

shunoutdoor

Dealers may not stock bows that are not marketed in their area

It is important to note that the availability of recurve bows in archery stores can vary due to various factors, and one possible reason is that dealers tend to stock products that are in demand and aligned with the local market. Dealers and archery stores, like any business, prioritize stocking items that their local customer base demands. They stay informed about the latest trends and products in the archery community within their region. If a particular type of bow, such as a recurve bow, is not commonly used or in demand among their customers, dealers may choose not to stock it to avoid tying up resources in slow-moving inventory.

This decision is often influenced by the dealer's understanding of the local market and the type of archery practiced in their area. For example, if the dealer's customer base primarily participates in compound bow tournaments or hunts with compound bows, there may be little demand for recurve bows, leading the dealer to allocate more shelf space to compound bow options and related accessories. Dealers aim to maximize their sales and profit margins by catering to the preferences and needs of their local archery community. This can result in variations in inventory across different regions, reflecting the specific demands and trends within each local market.

Additionally, dealers often develop relationships with specific manufacturers or brands that are popular in their area. This can influence the products they choose to stock, as they may receive better pricing, support, and marketing materials from these partnered brands. If a particular brand has a strong presence in the region and offers a range of compound bows but lacks options for recurve bows, it can further influence the dealer's decision to focus on compound bows to meet customer expectations and maintain strong relationships with local manufacturers.

In some cases, dealers may also consider the level of expertise and interest in traditional archery within their customer base. Recurve bows are often associated with traditional archery and may require a different set of skills and techniques compared to compound bows. If the dealer's customers primarily consist of beginners or archers seeking the latest technology and highest performance, the demand for recurve bows may be lower, causing dealers to allocate their resources to products that align with the skill level and interests of their target audience.

To summarize, dealers' inventory decisions are driven by a combination of local market demands, customer preferences, relationships with manufacturers, and an understanding of the skills and interests of their customer base. By stocking products that are in sync with these factors, dealers can ensure they provide relevant options and maximize their sales potential. This dynamic nature of inventory based on local trends contributes to the variability in the availability of recurve bows across different archery stores.

Archery: Sport or Exercise?

You may want to see also

Frequently asked questions

Recurve bows are not commonly stocked by archery stores because they are expensive to stock and there are too many models in the product line.

Archery stores may not stock recurve bows because they are not in high demand.

Archery stores may not stock recurve bows because they are not suitable for their local market.

Written by
Reviewed by
Share this post
Print
Did this article help you?

Leave a comment