Pa Deer Archery: Date Shift

why has pa archery for deer changed date

Deer hunting season in Pennsylvania has seen some changes in 2023-24. The statewide archery season for deer hunting opened on September 30 and will close on November 17. Hunters in Wildlife Management Units 2B, 5C, and 5D will have a longer archery season, which includes September 16 to November 24 and December 26 to January 27. The late season for deer hunting will be from January 26 to January 15, 2024.

Characteristics Values
Date of search 2023-07-07
Statewide archery season Sept. 30-Nov. 17
Late season Jan. 26-Jan. 15
Wildlife Management Units with longer archery seasons 2B, 5C, 5D
Dates of longer archery seasons Sept. 16-Nov. 24, Dec. 26-Jan. 27

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The statewide archery season opens September 30 to November 17

The statewide archery season in Pennsylvania opens from September 30 to November 17, with an additional Sunday, November 12, included. This season applies to hunters using long, recurve and compound bows, as well as crossbows.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission provides a variety of seasons and regulations that hunters need to be aware of. For instance, hunters in Wildlife Management Units 2B, 5C, and 5D have a longer archery season, which includes September 16 to November 24 and December 26 to January 27.

It's important to note that hunters must possess the appropriate licenses and follow specific tagging requirements when harvesting deer. Additionally, there are particular dates and regulations for muzzleloader and special firearms seasons, as well as restrictions on the use of fluorescent orange clothing during certain periods.

The landscape of hunting in Pennsylvania has evolved over time, with changes in technology, legislation, and hunting practices. For example, in 1993, the archery season was extended from four weeks to six weeks, and crossbows were legalized for all archery deer and bear seasons in 2009.

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Hunters must wear 250 square inches of fluorescent orange clothing

Hunters in Pennsylvania must wear at least 250 square inches of fluorescent orange clothing on their heads, chests, and backs during the regular firearms deer season and October muzzleloader season. This requirement is in place to ensure hunter safety by increasing visibility for other hunters.

The fluorescent colour, also known as "blaze orange" or "hunter orange", is particularly effective as deer are unable to see it, while remaining visible to other hunters. This measure was introduced in 1980, when deer, bear, and woodchuck hunters were required by law to wear at least 100 square inches of fluorescent orange material on the head, or on the chest and back combined. The required amount of fluorescent orange was increased to 250 square inches in 1992.

It is important to note that this requirement does not apply to hunters using bows and arrows or muzzleloading firearms, although local laws may apply. Additionally, hunters in Pennsylvania are advised to check the latest state regulations before the hunting season to stay up-to-date with any changes or additions to the requirements.

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Deer must be tagged before the carcass is moved

Deer hunting is a popular sport in Pennsylvania, and it is strictly regulated to ensure the safety of hunters and the ethical treatment of the animals. One such regulation states that "Deer must be tagged before the carcass is moved". This means that once a deer has been harvested, the hunter must immediately fill out the necessary paperwork and attach it to the animal. This process is crucial for a few reasons. Firstly, tagging the deer with the correct harvest tag ensures that the deer is legally marked as having been taken during a specific season with the proper license. This helps to prevent poaching and illegal hunting activities.

The harvest tags have specific instructions that must be followed carefully. Hunters need to detach the deer harvest tag from their license, fill it out with a ballpoint pen, and securely attach it to the deer's ear. The new green harvest tags have a section on the back with boxes for the month and date of the harvest, which must be accurately selected. This process ensures that the deer is properly documented and can be traced back to the hunter who took it.

It is important to note that only the harvest tag should be attached to the deer, and hunters should be careful not to attach their actual hunting license. The harvest tags have distinct animal icons on them, making them easily identifiable. The tag must remain attached to the deer's ear until the animal is prepared for consumption or mounting. This ensures that the deer can be properly identified throughout the processing stage. Additionally, the barcode on the tag should be positioned near the ear tip, unobstructed, to facilitate scanning by Game Commission personnel during the calculation of the annual statewide deer harvest.

The reason for tagging the deer's ear specifically is to guarantee that the tag stays with the head, even after butchering. This allows for valuable scientific information to be collected by the Game Commission researchers. If the tag were attached to a different part of the deer, such as the antler, the information would likely be lost once the antlers are removed and taken by the hunter. By adhering to these regulations, hunters play a crucial role in contributing to the scientific understanding of deer populations and hunting practices.

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Hunters can use long, recurve and compound bows and crossbows

Deer hunting in Pennsylvania has changed a lot over the years. Hunters are now required to wear fluorescent orange, and there are restrictions on antler size. The opening day of the rifle season has also changed from the Monday after Thanksgiving to the Saturday after.

In terms of equipment, hunters can use long, recurve and compound bows, as well as crossbows. The use of crossbows has been a controversial topic among hunters, with some arguing that it is not a bow and should not be allowed during archery season. However, crossbows were legalized for all archery deer and bear seasons in 2009.

For those using bows, there is a minimum draw weight requirement of 35 pounds. Additionally, an arrow and crossbow bolt must be equipped with a broadhead. Magnifying scopes and red-dot sights can be used with crossbows. There are specific requirements for broadheads: they must have an outside diameter or width of at least 7/8 of an inch, and the length may not exceed 3.25 inches.

Pennsylvania offers a range of deer hunting seasons, including the statewide archery season, late season, and special seasons for muzzleloader and firearms. Hunters should be aware of the regulations and requirements for each season, including the necessary licenses and tags.

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The late season is January 26 to January 15

The late archery season for deer hunting in Pennsylvania is January 26 to January 15. This late season follows the statewide archery season, which opens on September 30 and ends on November 17.

During the late season, hunters can use long, recurve and compound bows, as well as crossbows. This is a good opportunity for archers to bag a trophy buck, as it coincides with the rut, or mating season, when there is an increase in deer activity.

Hunters in Wildlife Management Units 2B around Pittsburgh and 5C and 5D in southeastern Pennsylvania have a longer archery season, which includes September 16 to November 24 and December 26 to January 27.

The late flintlock-only muzzleloader season is December 26 to January 15, extending to January 27 in WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D. This is the only season in which an antlered tag can be used for antlerless deer. Hunters must have a muzzleloader license in addition to a general license to participate.

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Frequently asked questions

The date for archery deer hunting season in Pennsylvania has changed to include more time for hunting during the rut, or mating season, which increases the chances of hunters bagging a trophy buck.

The statewide archery season is Sept. 30-Nov. 17, including Sunday, Nov. 12.

Hunters can use long, recurve and compound bows, and crossbows.

Yes, hunters require different licenses for antlered and antlerless deer.

Hunters are limited to one antlered deer per hunting license year and one antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

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