Archery's Sobering Rule

why is alcohol banned in archery

Alcohol is considered a banned substance at any competition under World Archery rules. The World Archery Executive Board treats alcohol use with the same penalties that apply to other banned substances under the World Anti-Doping Code. While it may seem obvious that drinking alcohol and shooting arrows is not a safe combination, the rules ban any amount of alcohol during a competition, and archers are subject to testing. Alcohol can steady an archer's hand, giving them an unfair advantage during a competition, making it a performance-enhancing drug for the sport.

Characteristics Values
Reason for ban Alcohol is considered a performance-enhancing drug as it can steady an archer's hand
Governing body World Archery
Testing Athletes are subject to testing during competitions
Penalties Penalties for the presence of alcohol are the same as for other banned substances

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Alcohol is a performance-enhancing drug in archery

Alcohol is considered a performance-enhancing drug in archery. While it may seem obvious that shooting arrows while drunk is unsafe, alcohol is banned in archery competitions because it can steady an archer's hand, giving them an unfair advantage over their competitors.

Alcohol has been a banned substance in archery competitions since 2018, when the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) removed it from its prohibited list. Despite this, World Archery has continued to enforce a ban on alcohol at its international events, treating alcohol use with the same penalties that apply to other banned substances under the World Anti-Doping Code. This means that archers are subject to testing for alcohol during competitions, and if any traces of alcohol are found, they will be penalised.

World Archery has expressed disappointment with WADA's decision to remove alcohol from its banned list, stating that they believe alcohol fulfils all three criteria necessary to ban a substance in competition. In support of this, World Archery has cited a study from the 1980s by its medical committee, which demonstrated alcohol's performance-enhancing effects in the sport. As a result, World Archery intends to continue banning alcohol at its events and will implement additional measures to enforce this.

The ban on alcohol in archery competitions is not an isolated case, as alcohol was previously outlawed in three other sports: air sports, motor racing, and powerboating. This highlights the recognition of alcohol's potential to influence performance and the importance of maintaining a level playing field for all competitors.

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World Archery treats alcohol use like doping

Alcohol is considered a banned substance at any competition under World Archery rules. World Archery treats alcohol use like doping, and it has continued to test for alcohol at its international events. The World Archery Executive Board has banned alcohol use at archery competitions, applying the same penalties that apply to other banned substances under the World Anti-Doping Code. This means that athletes are subject to testing for alcohol, and if it is found in their system, they will be penalised.

World Archery's stance on alcohol is based on the same principles as the World Anti-Doping Code, which states that athletes are responsible for any banned substance found in their system, regardless of intent to cheat. World Archery's interpretation of the rules clarifies that athletes must ensure they are free of alcohol at any time during a competition when they could be tested. If the presence of alcohol is detected, the athlete will be deemed to have broken the rules and will face penalties.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) removed alcohol from its banned list in 2018, but World Archery expressed disappointment with this decision and continues to implement its own rules banning alcohol. World Archery considers alcohol a performance-enhancing substance in archery, and a study by its medical committee in the 1980s demonstrated this effect. Alcohol can steady an archer's hand, giving them an unfair advantage during competition. Therefore, World Archery treats alcohol use as seriously as doping, and athletes are expected to abide by these rules to maintain the integrity of the sport.

The anti-doping rules for Archery GB are consistent with the World Anti-Doping Code, and they work in partnership with UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) to uphold these standards. Archery GB has emphasised the importance of clean sport and fair competition, ensuring that all athletes have the right to compete knowing that they and their competitors are free of banned substances. These regulations extend beyond simply performing in competitions, as athletes must also be mindful of prohibited substances in their training and preparation.

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World Archery's disappointment with WADA's removal of the alcohol ban

World Archery has expressed disappointment with the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) removal of alcohol from its banned list. Alcohol was previously prohibited in four sports: archery, air sports, motor racing, and powerboating. However, WADA announced the change in its 2018 list of prohibited substances, stating that alcohol can be easily tested with breathalysers and does not require a specialised anti-doping laboratory.

World Archery, in a statement issued by Secretary General Tom Dielen, expressed regret over WADA's decision, stating that they believe all three necessary criteria to ban a substance are met in the case of alcohol in archery competitions. They emphasised their commitment to maintaining a clean sport and reiterated their intention to continue banning alcohol in their events. World Archery also highlighted the performance-enhancing effects of alcohol in archery, supported by a study from the 1980s by their medical committee.

The dispute is notable as Ugur Erdener, the President of World Archery, is also a member of the WADA Executive Committee as an Olympic sport representative. Despite World Archery's disappointment, WADA's decision provides flexibility to individual sports governing bodies to regulate alcohol consumption as they see fit, even implementing a zero-tolerance policy if necessary.

While National Anti-Doping Organisations are no longer required to conduct alcohol tests, they can still provide assistance to governing bodies when appropriate. World Archery hopes that this shift will increase the number of alcohol tests conducted at the national level, addressing past issues with some National Anti-Doping Agencies refusing to test for alcohol. World Archery plans to implement additional measures to uphold their commitment to a clean sport, including adopting rules to maintain their alcohol ban at their upcoming Executive Board meeting.

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Alcohol abuse by an accredited person contravenes World Archery's code of ethics

World Archery has expressed disappointment in the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) decision to remove alcohol from its banned list starting in 2018. Alcohol was previously prohibited in four sports: archery, air sports, motor racing, and powerboating. However, WADA's change meant that National Anti-Doping Organisations were no longer required to conduct alcohol tests.

World Archery maintains that alcohol has a performance-enhancing effect in archery. A study conducted by their medical committee in the 1980s supported this claim, and they intended to conduct further research to reaffirm these results. They believe that the substance should be banned in competition due to its potential to improve performance.

World Archery's code of ethics emphasizes the importance of maintaining a clean sport, which includes prohibiting the use of performance-enhancing substances like alcohol. Accredited persons, such as coaches, officials, or other staff members, are expected to uphold these ethical standards and refrain from alcohol abuse. Their conduct should reflect the values of fairness, safety, and integrity in the sport.

Alcohol abuse by accredited persons can have negative consequences for the individuals involved, the organization, and the sport as a whole. It can lead to impaired judgment, unprofessional behavior, and a breach of the ethical standards expected by World Archery. As such, alcohol abuse by accredited persons is considered a serious matter and is addressed through their code of ethics and conduct.

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The liability of athletes to ensure they are alcohol-free during competitions

Alcohol is considered a banned substance at any competition under World Archery rules. This means that athletes are liable to ensure they are alcohol-free during competitions, as the presence of alcohol in their system during a competition will result in penalties. The World Archery Executive Board treats in-competition alcohol use like doping, with the same penalties applying to other banned substances under the World Anti-Doping Code.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) previously recognised alcohol as a banned substance in archery, along with air sports, motor racing, and powerboating. However, in 2018, WADA removed alcohol from its list of prohibited substances, much to the disappointment of World Archery. Despite this, World Archery continues to uphold its ban on alcohol during competitions and has implemented additional measures to reinforce this rule.

Archery organisations, such as Archery GB, work in partnership with their respective anti-doping agencies to ensure that athletes are educated about the anti-doping rules and the consequences of breaking them. Athletes are responsible for ensuring that their systems are free of any prohibited substances, including alcohol, during competitions. They are advised to check the updated list of prohibited substances regularly and be mindful of the medications they take to ensure compliance with the anti-doping rules.

In summary, the liability of athletes to ensure they are alcohol-free during archery competitions is essential to uphold the integrity of the sport, maintain fair competition, and adhere to the rules set by governing bodies such as World Archery and their respective anti-doping agencies. Archers are expected to be aware of the prohibited substances, educate themselves on the risks, and take responsibility for their actions to ensure a clean and fair competitive environment.

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Frequently asked questions

Alcohol is considered a banned substance at any competition under World Archery rules. It is treated as a performance-enhancing drug as it can steady an archer's hand, giving them an unfair advantage.

Yes, alcohol was previously outlawed in air sports, motor racing, and powerboating.

If an athlete is found to have alcohol in their system during a competition, they will be subject to penalties as outlined by the World Anti-Doping Code.

The World Archery Executive Board enforces the ban on alcohol, and they conduct tests for alcohol at their international events.

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