Archery And Finger Numbness

why is my finger numb after archery

Archery is a fun and challenging sport, but it can also be dangerous if you don't take the proper precautions. One common issue that archers face is finger numbness. This can be caused by a variety of factors, including improper technique, inadequate finger protection, and even nerve damage. It's important to address finger numbness right away, as it can lead to permanent damage if left untreated.

One of the main causes of finger numbness in archers is improper technique. This can include incorrect finger placement on the string, such as hooking the string in the grooves of the joints instead of using a deep hook on the middle segment of the finger. Incorrect elbow height and angle during the draw can also contribute to finger numbness.

Inadequate finger protection is another common cause of finger numbness in archers. This can be addressed by using a finger tab, glove, or mechanical release. Finger tabs are popular in the archery world and typically made from several layers of leather that protect the fingers from the string. Gloves provide similar protection and are especially useful for those shooting in cold weather. Mechanical releases remove the fingers from contact with the string entirely and may be a good option for those experiencing severe finger numbness.

Nerve damage is a more serious cause of finger numbness in archers. This can be caused by crushing or pinching a nerve in the finger, often due to incorrect finger placement or insufficient protection. Nerve damage can lead to permanent numbness if not addressed promptly.

If you're experiencing finger numbness after archery, it's important to take a break from shooting and give your fingers time to heal. Consult with your instructor to review your technique and ensure you're using the proper finger protection. Making these adjustments will help you safely continue your archery practice and prevent further damage to your fingers.

Characteristics Values
Cause of numbness Tissue or nerve damage
Prevention Finger protection, e.g. finger tabs, gloves, or mechanical releases
Glove material Leather, suede, or cordovan
Glove type Full-hand, partial hand, or fingertip gloves
Other options Medical tape, thicker tab, or deep hook technique

shunoutdoor

Nerve damage

The damage can be temporary, with some archers in online forums reporting that they experienced numbness for a few weeks or months, but then adjusted to the practice. However, other archers have reported permanent nerve damage, with one person saying they knew someone who had to give up archery altogether due to losing all feeling in their middle finger.

The best way to avoid nerve damage is to use finger protection. There are several types of products that can help prevent tissue or nerve damage, such as finger tabs, gloves, and mechanical releases. Finger tabs are quite popular in the archery world, and most are made from several layers of leather that you put between your fingers and the bow. Gloves also provide similar protection to tabs, but you don't have to worry about holding them or keeping track of them. Mechanical releases are another option, but these are not allowed in most competitions.

If you are experiencing finger numbness, you should stop shooting until the feeling returns. You should also consult a doctor, as numbness in the extremities can be a sign of disease.

Suaoki PF3: Archery's New Friend?

You may want to see also

shunoutdoor

Tissue damage

Finger numbness after archery can be caused by tissue damage. This is often the result of repeatedly drawing the string with your bare hand, which can overload the sensation of touch in your fingertips. Tissue damage can also be caused by incorrect finger placement, such as hooking the string in the grooves of your joints. This can put too much pressure on your middle finger, leading to numbness and potentially permanent nerve damage.

To prevent tissue damage, it is important to use adequate finger protection, such as finger tabs, gloves, or mechanical releases. Finger tabs are a popular option, typically made from several layers of leather that act as a cushion between your fingers and the bow. When choosing a finger tab, look for one with enough thickness to provide adequate protection. Archery gloves are another option, offering similar protection to finger tabs while also keeping your hands warm in cold weather.

If you continue to experience finger numbness despite using finger protection, you may need to adjust your technique. Ensure that you are using the proper deep finger hooking technique, which helps to keep your fingers safe and prevent numbness. Additionally, check that you are placing the string in the first joint/crease of all three fingers, rather than on the fingertips.

It is important to take finger numbness seriously and make the necessary adjustments to your equipment and technique. Stop shooting until the numbness resolves, and consider consulting a doctor if the issue persists.

shunoutdoor

Incorrect technique

Numbness in the fingers after archery can be caused by incorrect technique. This can include incorrect finger placement on the string, incorrect hooking, and incorrect draw technique.

Incorrect finger placement on the string can cause numbness if the string is resting on the pads of the fingers rather than in the groove of the first joint of the three fingers. This can result in increased muscle tension in the drawing hand and potential nerve compression in the finger tips.

Incorrect hooking of the string can also cause numbness. The string should be hooked in the first joint of the pointer finger, behind the joint on the middle finger, and on the tip of the ring finger. Improper hooking can lead to soft tissue injury or nerve injury in the arms or neck.

Incorrect draw technique can include issues such as drawing with too much weight on the middle finger, not applying enough pressure with the ring finger, or having a draw length that is too long, all of which can contribute to finger numbness.

It is important to consult with instructors or coaches to ensure that one is using the correct technique to avoid finger numbness and potential long-term nerve damage.

Archery Lessons in New Jersey

You may want to see also

shunoutdoor

Inadequate finger protection

Numbness in the fingers after archery can be caused by inadequate finger protection. This can lead to nerve damage in the fingertips, which can become permanent if left untreated.

Archers should ensure they have the correct finger protection, such as a finger tab or glove, with enough padding to protect their fingers from the pressure and friction of the bowstring. It is recommended to have 1mm of leather padding for every 10 pounds of draw weight. For example, if you are pulling 50 pounds, you should have 5mm of leather padding.

In addition to adequate finger protection, it is important to use proper finger hooking technique. A "deep hook" technique, where the string is placed behind the joint of the finger, can help to reduce numbness and provide a stronger hold.

If you are experiencing finger numbness, it is important to stop shooting and give your fingers time to heal. Consult with a doctor if the numbness persists or if you are concerned about nerve damage.

  • You feel pain or tingling in your fingers during or after shooting.
  • Your fingers become numb during or after shooting.
  • You have blisters or calluses on your fingers.
  • You are experiencing finger soreness or arthritic pain.

If you notice any of these signs, it is important to take action to improve your finger protection and technique to prevent further damage. This may include adding extra layers of leather to your finger tab, using a thicker glove, or consulting with an instructor to improve your finger hooking technique.

Archery Lessons: Karachi's Best Ranges

You may want to see also

shunoutdoor

Health conditions

Numbness in the fingers after archery is not uncommon, especially for beginners. However, it is important to take this issue seriously as it can be a sign of tissue or nerve damage, or even a symptom of an underlying health condition. Here are some health conditions that may be related to finger numbness after archery:

Tissue or Nerve Damage:

Archery puts repeated pressure on the fingers, which can lead to tissue or nerve damage over time. This is especially true if you are not using proper finger protection, such as a finger tab, glove, or mechanical release. Nerve damage can cause a loss of sensation, tingling, or numbness in the affected fingers. In some cases, this damage can become permanent if left untreated. It is important to allow your fingers to heal and prevent further damage by using adequate protection.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome:

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition that occurs when the median nerve in the wrist is compressed. This nerve provides sensation to the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and part of the ring finger. Archery, especially with improper form or without finger protection, can put strain on this nerve and lead to carpal tunnel syndrome. Symptoms include numbness, tingling, or pain in the affected fingers, as well as weakness or discomfort in the hand and wrist.

Herniated Disc in the Neck:

A herniated disc in the neck, or cervical spine, can cause compression of the spinal nerves, leading to symptoms such as numbness or tingling in the arms and hands. If you are experiencing neck pain or discomfort in addition to finger numbness after archery, this could be a possible cause.

Other Health Conditions:

In some cases, finger numbness can be a symptom of other health issues such as vitamin deficiencies, diabetes, or problems with the nervous system. If you are experiencing persistent or frequent finger numbness, it is important to consult with a medical professional to rule out any underlying health conditions.

It is important to note that proper form, technique, and finger protection are crucial in preventing finger numbness and other injuries related to archery. Consult with a qualified instructor or coach to ensure that you are using the correct form and finger protection for your individual needs.

Frequently asked questions

Written by
Reviewed by
Share this post
Print
Did this article help you?

Leave a comment